Link: Scapegoating Good and Evil

<a href=”https://open.spotify.com/episode/2YcG8KQKzQngSA5TKq6Xt1?si=8nTrQQjdS_SS6XrUj1AV0w”Link to “James Alison – Scapegoat: How Civilisation Harms and How the Cross Heals (N184)””

Mindblowing explaination on the reasoning behind the conflict between the ‘Life and Death’ dynmic against the ‘Good and Evil’ dynamic in Genesis, and how the Cross solves that confusion.

My understanding of this is that love is the pursuit of life (the goal of all monotheistic religions), and that this fulfils the knowledge of good and evil, represented by the two trees in the garden of eden.

If a society pursues the knowledge of good and evil, which is also the law that results from our innate ability to imitate one another, then the innocent are inevitably scapegoated to fulfil it and achieve societal peace. The wrath of God is pointed at the wrath of mankind against their innocent scapegoats, so that the cross satisfies the wrath of God, by satisfying the wrath of mankind, and thereby making it impossible for scapegoats to be seen as inherently evil.

This frees mankind to live free from the fear of being the persecuted scapegoat in society and to pursue life as a new creation, freed from that law, to live life of love; and, in doing so, fulfil the law, making them righteous in the sight of God.

Since it is life, and not arbitrary goodness, that sanctifies, then only by valuing life over goodness, through faith, in agreement with the grace of his cross, is a person sanctified, and not from good works.

The cross changes the frame from, “blame the person responsible and sort him out” to “work inclusively with everyone to make things better”

Not that no one is responsible, the law (knowlege of good an evil) shows to what degree each person is responsible, but that placing blame is not relevant to a world where none are guiltless before God, and all are facing the threat of death. And that is the good new of Jesus Christ, a new way of living, where the knowledge of good and evil is replaced with the pursuit of life through personal and voluntary sacrifice.

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